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TARRA: Finding Our Voice After the Women’s March on Washington

Last Saturday we marched. Today we are firmly grounded in a new era of uncertainty.

Saturday, January 21, 2017, citizens of the world took to the streets in a breathtaking display of solidarity transcending, national and international borders; differences in age, race, and gender; income brackets; and sociopolitical perspectives. Women’s marches around the world united more than 2,000,000 voices, in a fight against the ethos of tyranny, oppression, racism, sexism, and patriarchy.

What will happen after the Women’s March on Washington fades into memory?

Once the echo of historic speeches, chants and battle cries have faded to memory, and daily life resumes its frenzied pace, that is when we most need to summon the strength forged this January 21. Two days, two weeks, two months and two years from now, our success will be defined by what comes next. It will be the small, thoughtful, daily actions offered by each and every one of you that will collectively move the meter in a big, meaningful way.

Women's March on Washington

Associated Press

At the Women’s March on Washington, writer and political activist Angela Davis reminded us that we can only achieve our goals through tenacity, strength and unwavering commitment to our common goal.

“Over the next months and years we will be called upon to intensify our demands for social justice to become more militant in our defense of vulnerable populations. Those who still defend the supremacy of white male hetero-patriarchy had better watch out. The next 1,459 days of the Trump administration will be 1,459 days of resistance: Resistance on the ground, resistance in the classrooms, resistance on the job, resistance in our art and in our music.”

What does resistance look like?

At TARRA, we long debated whether or not we wanted to be “political”, watching as a joke, became a threat, became a president. At first, I was hesitant to jump into the us vs. them dialogue, instead opting for the “higher ground.”

However, the more I stew in this new reality, the more disturbed I feel…not just by the rhetoric coming from the mouths of our new leadership, but also by the awareness that in 2017 the act of simply being “a woman” is a political “problem”.

Putting misogyny, bigotry and discrimination aside for a moment…

Women's March on Washington

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The unsettling news coming out of Washington these days feels like one rip of the carpet after another. Recent reports suggest that Trump’s team is considering eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, which offer grants for artistic and educational productions, exhibitions, research and more.  

It is deeply disappointing to feel that the current state of affairs—both national and international—risks sending the movement for equal rights back to the Victorian age, while simultaneously setting off a series of policies that will have lasting effect for generations to come.

We won’t stand by idle, waiting for the guillotine to fall.

What daily actions can you take to make a difference?

As individuals, it is overwhelming to consider how we can stand up against the rip tide of changes taking place before our very eyes.

In light of this, TARRA leadership has decided to use this platform as a collective voice to give each of you the power to effect change. We are stronger together!

Following our launch in October and subsequent conversations with the TARRA community, we have decided to champion three common goals voices by the women we represent

  1. Preserve and promote women’s contribution to culture, art and design
  1. Ensure that young women around the world are given the tools they need to pursue their dream of a career in design
  1. Provide a supportive and nurturing community to help women-owned design businesses thrive

Gloria Steinem beautifully concluded:

“We are here and around the world for a deep democracy that says we will not be quiet, we will not be controlled, we will work for a world in which all countries are connected. God may be in the details, but the goddess is in connections.

We are at one with each other, we are looking at each other, not up. No more asking daddy. We are linked. We are not ranked. And this is a day that will change us forever because we are together…we’re never going home. We’re staying together. And we’re taking over.”

The time is now. Are you with us?

Women's March on Washington

Associated Press

2 replies
  1. Jennifer Egbert
    Jennifer Egbert says:

    Very well-written read. I’m glad I came across this. It is certainly an interesting time to be a woman. I love the quote by Gloria Steinem — “We are linked. We are not ranked.” It’s an incredibly important time for coming together. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

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